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Old May 22nd, 2017, 06:37 AM   #11
RSL
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A cutting edge scientist did a study of three ways to plug his motorcycle tire. A guy who's patents allow aircraft to fly further than ever before. A smart guy.

His conclusion is that the Dynaplug is fine for the smallest holes. The Safety Seal is tops for all other hole repairs. That the mushroom plugs aren't suitable for thin motorcycle tire repairs.

I carry two sizes of Safety Seal plugs. That way I can repair what happens on the road.

Having repaired numerous road flats on my bikes, Safety Seal has easily proven to be the most reliable repair. Repairs that allow me to use the tire through the end of the ride.
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Old May 23rd, 2017, 07:44 AM   #12
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What you carry depends on what kind of traveling you do, and what type of repairs you can actually do roadside. You're prepping for an unexpected event, and even a small one can cause trouble. For example, i had a mirror start flopping - small event but real trouble on the road. I had the 2 open end wrenches I needed, and resolved the problem.

Here's what I carry on longer trips:

small vice clamp: if a lever breaks, it can be an emergency fix, also a 3rd hand.

screw driver handle with 1/4" chuck - T20,T25,slotted, and #2 phillips head 1/4" shank drivers. The T20 lets you change and adjust headlamp (nothing like pitch black when that blows), T25 - change front brake pads - others speak for themselves.

1/4" ratchet with suitable allan and sockets: adjust chain, change oil, tighten loose stuff.

wd40, lube, small brush, nitriles, chain adjust wrench and plastic chain measurer thing I made: chain maintenance.

zip ties (good ones), gorrilla tape, hose tape, nut locker , nitriles, shop towels

small snips, leatherman, knipex thing that's amazing (https://www.amazon.com/Knipex-860318...=knipex+pliers)

spare fuses, some wire, spare headlamp, spare spark pug and suitable wrench (they're way down there)

pump, plugs, cement in 3 small tubes (because once opened I don't trust them no to dry out). Small hand pump, just in case(this will kill me if I need it, but ...

small battery booster

Looks like a lot, but the tools wrap nicely in some old tarp (nice for laying out removed parts, and 2 binding straps (useful if zippers give etc..)

Maybe a boyscout, but I've used a lot of it on the road, and the difference between limping around, being stuck etc.. might be one $3.00 tool and 10 minutes of time.
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Old May 23rd, 2017, 08:39 AM   #13
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For me it is where one travels that decides the level of preparedness necessary.

If I was traveling to 3rd world countries a good self-reliant level of tools and spare parts would be necessary.

Traveling around the US for over 250,000 miles on backroad adventures (paved and unpaved), the only necessary emergency tools necessary have been tire repair. All other loose this or that could easily be resolved with a stop at an auto parts store.

But then, I pack light and travel fast. I used to carry a lot of tools way back when. Then, it dawned on me how seasoned travelers were indeed correct in the assertion that a credit card is what solves problems best. Tire repair to keep traveling, quality tow company for catastrophic failure, and a credit card for the rest.

Over the 6,000 miles I've had my Hyperstrada the single issue has been a flat tire.
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Old May 23rd, 2017, 11:38 AM   #14
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Guys, I started with a lot of tools as I came from enduro riding where we were on our own.

That tool kit changed with each motorcycle I rode over the years, and whether I was off-road or on street rides.

One day I took stock of just how many tools I was weighing the suspension down with and was shocked. It was then I made a serious effort to decided what was actually needed.

Then reality set in that I seldom needed any tools. Any tool I needed was easily purchased anywhere along a route. Buy cheap, use it, then throw away.

If I crash, I'm calling Good Sam.

If I get a flat, I am unwilling to wait so carry tire repair stuff. 10 minutes and I'm riding again.

Otherwise, my well maintained bikes just don't have issues.

On my 2,000 to 3,000 mile rides, I don't even check tire pressure or mess with the chain. All that can wait for my return home. The place where maintenance is done.

Even when I had 6,000 to 7,000 mile rides, I learned to leave the air pressure alone as it changed with altitude and temperature. Generally, I do the same ride maintenance that I do if I was driving a car. Gas refills, that's it. Other than a flat, the rest can wait.

Long gone are the days of inner tubes and carburetors. Thank goodness. No more jetting for altitude. No more spooning tires to fix a tube. Now I just focus on the ride.

Last edited by RSL; May 23rd, 2017 at 11:43 AM.
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Old May 23rd, 2017, 02:44 PM   #15
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RSL, on 2-3k rides you don't clean or lube the chain?
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Old May 23rd, 2017, 04:22 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MartyGarrison View Post
RSL, on 2-3k rides you don't clean or lube the chain?
Nope. Why would I? With O-ring chains the critical bearing surfaces remain lubricated. All exterior lubes merely prevent corrosion. I use a good lubricant/protectant to prevent corrosion.

The old days of needing constant lubrication ended with the O-ring, X-ring and now even Z-ring chains.
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Old May 23rd, 2017, 05:38 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by appliance821 View Post
What you carry depends on what kind of traveling you do, and what type of repairs you can actually do roadside. You're prepping for an unexpected event, and even a small one can cause trouble. For example, i had a mirror start flopping - small event but real trouble on the road. I had the 2 open end wrenches I needed, and resolved the problem.

Here's what I carry on longer trips:

small vice clamp: if a lever breaks, it can be an emergency fix, also a 3rd hand.

screw driver handle with 1/4" chuck - T20,T25,slotted, and #2 phillips head 1/4" shank drivers. The T20 lets you change and adjust headlamp (nothing like pitch black when that blows), T25 - change front brake pads - others speak for themselves.

1/4" ratchet with suitable allan and sockets: adjust chain, change oil, tighten loose stuff.

wd40, lube, small brush, nitriles, chain adjust wrench and plastic chain measurer thing I made: chain maintenance.

zip ties (good ones), gorrilla tape, hose tape, nut locker , nitriles, shop towels

small snips, leatherman, knipex thing that's amazing (https://www.amazon.com/Knipex-860318...=knipex+pliers)

spare fuses, some wire, spare headlamp, spare spark pug and suitable wrench (they're way down there)

pump, plugs, cement in 3 small tubes (because once opened I don't trust them no to dry out). Small hand pump, just in case(this will kill me if I need it, but ...

small battery booster

Looks like a lot, but the tools wrap nicely in some old tarp (nice for laying out removed parts, and 2 binding straps (useful if zippers give etc..)

Maybe a boyscout, but I've used a lot of it on the road, and the difference between limping around, being stuck etc.. might be one $3.00 tool and 10 minutes of time.
Good list of tools and good advice. I've had lots of things loosen up, fall off, even on brand new bikes. I've done probably 20 bike launches (magazine) and even there ... very occasionally something fall off a bike.

So a few carefully chosen and tested tools are a good thing. Not really a burden to pack. I never re-use an opened rubber cement tube ... carry 3 or 4 small ones, all unopened. You can't use too much when inserting a plug in a tight hole.

But as RSL says, good PREP is key. If your bike is well prepped and set up, it's unlikely you will have problems beyond a flat or crash.
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Old May 23rd, 2017, 06:47 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by migrane View Post
Roger that ... So good compressor, flat tire repair kit , credit and cash is your recommendation ...

I am still fighting that urge to carry some stuff with me ... Will see what I pair it down to ... I'm the guy that has a ham radio go-bag with everything to talk to the moon and back packed into a small hair dryer pouch

I've not yet gotten to the camera equipment ... lots to sort out

Migrane
Cash & Credit cards a must .... but ...
Main thing with a compressor (which I carry too) and flat repair is knowing how to do the actual repair side of road. If you've never put in a string plug or other type, you need to know how. Technique plays a part.

Unlikely you'll be doing a full engine rebuild side of road but IMO, important to have a good basic tool kit and other Accessories. Things sometimes come loose, fall off. Good bike prep is the key:

Start with NEW tires, EXCELLENT chain and sprockets and new to new-ish battery. Check all fasteners, loc-tite if required.

One of the worst things (and common) is having your chain crap out half way into a long ride. Remember, the front sprocket is first to wear ... keep it fresh and your chain and rear sprocket will also last longer. But don't leave on a trip with questionable chain (like much over 10K miles on it)

A compressor will pump up tire easily ... even the BEST bicycle hand pump takes quite a while. But keep in mind a compressor will NOT re-seat bead if you somehow break the bead. (unlikely, but possible) True hard core ADVer's carry a tube for "just in case". (I do not)

Flats are a pain and why I run SLIME (or Ride-On) in my tires. Ride-On is better. Remember, you put it in BEFORE you get a flat as a preventative. It can work well ... but not always. Downside is tire plugs may not stay in place if they contact SLIME. Wash well to get SLIME away.
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Old May 23rd, 2017, 07:53 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hyp Noob View Post
Good list of tools and good advice. I've had lots of things loosen up, fall off, even on brand new bikes. I've done probably 20 bike launches (magazine) and even there ... very occasionally something fall off a bike.

So a few carefully chosen and tested tools are a good thing. Not really a burden to pack. I never re-use an opened rubber cement tube ... carry 3 or 4 small ones, all unopened. You can't use too much when inserting a plug in a tight hole.

But as RSL says, good PREP is key. If your bike is well prepped and set up, it's unlikely you will have problems beyond a flat or crash.
Yeah it's all in a kit so I just throw it in. Prep is key, but the unexpected is just that. A friend's bike blew over and we had to do some roadside work on it, headlight blew, chain mucked from a long dirt excursion - stuff happens.

RSL has tons of experience and has his method well thought out - I like mine - always refining it. Somehow I view it all as RTW prep. - a person can dream.
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Old May 23rd, 2017, 07:57 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hyp Noob View Post
Cash & Credit cards a must .... but ...
Main thing with a compressor (which I carry too) and flat repair is knowing how to do the actual repair side of road. If you've never put in a string plug or other type, you need to know how. Technique plays a part.

Unlikely you'll be doing a full engine rebuild side of road but IMO, important to have a good basic tool kit and other Accessories. Things sometimes come loose, fall off. Good bike prep is the key:

Start with NEW tires, EXCELLENT chain and sprockets and new to new-ish battery. Check all fasteners, loc-tite if required.

One of the worst things (and common) is having your chain crap out half way into a long ride. Remember, the front sprocket is first to wear ... keep it fresh and your chain and rear sprocket will also last longer. But don't leave on a trip with questionable chain (like much over 10K miles on it)

A compressor will pump up tire easily ... even the BEST bicycle hand pump takes quite a while. But keep in mind a compressor will NOT re-seat bead if you somehow break the bead. (unlikely, but possible) True hard core ADVer's carry a tube for "just in case". (I do not)

Flats are a pain and why I run SLIME (or Ride-On) in my tires. Ride-On is better. Remember, you put it in BEFORE you get a flat as a preventative. It can work well ... but not always. Downside is tire plugs may not stay in place if they contact SLIME. Wash well to get SLIME away.
Great tips on chain/tires. Good to bear in mind. Once watched a guy at a desert gas station ride his GW up a ramp into a rent a truck because his tires were down to the plys. Got halfway up and started to hesitate - we all yelled NOOOO! he gassed it and the rest is history.
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