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Old June 8th, 2013, 05:31 AM   #1
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Fuel Tank Expansion

Hello: going to the dealer to check on an arctic white HS today. big concern is fuel tank polymer composition. have had 3 tanks on my 09 MS and really don't want to have to mess about with that crap again. any information would be appreciated. thanks in advance.
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Old June 10th, 2013, 08:49 PM   #2
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All I can tell you is that the new Hyper fuel tank does appear to be made of a different composition than the other bikes, though whether it'll prove to be more ethanol resistent in the long run will have to wait for the long run. The nice thing is that the tank is well recessed in the bike and shouldn't be the hassle it is on Monsters, Sport Classics and Multistradas where a swollen tank can get really loose or impede serviceability of the bike. The ultimate rule of law is that no vehicle can go out of emissions compliance in and of itself without modification or damage by the owner. This means that if your tank ever swells the manufacturer is obligated to replace it, regardless of whether the vehicle is still under warranty or not. Two tanks on my Multistrada and 3 on my Monster so far, but I don't care since they're free.
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Old June 11th, 2013, 05:08 AM   #3
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Ethanol-free pumps are popping up all over in my area. The more I read about what ethanol does to rings/tanks/rubber, the more I want to start using regularly. I have a big issue with the fact that they charge more for e-free...seriously, charging more for something that required less labor/refinement! YGBSM!
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Old June 11th, 2013, 06:00 AM   #4
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Isn’t the 94 octane stuff oxygen free?
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Old June 11th, 2013, 07:39 AM   #5
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I never been to a pump in FL that didn't have a sticker that read "...may contain up to 10% Ethanol..." I think it was a federal mandate that unleaded had to have Ethanol, which is a total farse if you're into gov't pork conspiracies.
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Old June 11th, 2013, 10:07 AM   #6
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I fount this posted else where.....


Quote:
"With all due respect, there is factual data to back the complaints about ethanol.

I work in the aerospace industry. E10 is NOT approved for use in aircraft. Period. Some folks do it under ideal conditions and get away with it, but they are taking their chances with engine-out situations.

In aircraft, ethanol-blended fuels are known to cause problems with:
--Carburetor icing
--Damage to fuel injection pumps
--Water in the fuel tanks
--Frozen fuel lines
--Aluminum tank corrosion
--Degradation of rubber lines, seals, and fittings (particularly on older airplanes... remember, a GA airplane has a useful life of several decades)

The only guys I know that ever risk flying E-10 are in newer aircraft with Rotax engines, these are sunny-Sunday fliers, they NEVER leave the aircraft parked out in the rain, and they do it knowing that they are violating the airframe and Rotax warnings.

In the Ferrari world, ethanol-blended fuels are causing massive headaches with corrosion inside their aluminum fuel tanks, and in the old aluminum Bosch CIS fuel distributors.

Ethanol-blended fuel killed the CIS fuel distributor in my '86 GTI. That car had zero fuel system problems until the mandated switch from MTBE to ethanol for oxygenation.

This is not a wild goose chase. It's chemistry.

Are the effects on the GC's nylon tanks debatable? Sure. We don't have a double-blind study with lots of samples to go on. We have a few riders who profess to have "no problems" and a few riders who have documented problems. But just because we do not have a conclusive study one way or another is not a reason to call it a wild goose chase. We have incomplete information (which the corn lobby actively works to keep incomplete), but there is still evidence from multiple sources to implicate material compatibility problems with ethanol-blended fuels.

Respectfully,
--Dan"

Last edited by jerdog53; June 11th, 2013 at 11:17 AM.
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Old June 11th, 2013, 10:58 AM   #7
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It'd be an easier pill to swallow if it had some performance or efficiency benefit...which, it does not. I think the environmental benefits have been argued, as well.
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Old June 11th, 2013, 12:18 PM   #8
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Shat! I stopped at the station with e-free fuel. 89 octane is the only option. I don't think taxing the timing system is worth it. That's assuming the ECU will compensate for lower octane fuel, which I'm not sure about.
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Old June 11th, 2013, 07:39 PM   #9
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Jerdog, I'm sure you meant ethanol free and not oxygen free, right? Oxygen is good stuff, ethanol bad, at least in our fine bikes. Anyhoo, at this point across our great expanse, you'll find ethanol commonly mixed with all grades of fuel regardless of octane rating. If you're lucky enough to live in a state that does offer ethanol-free grades of gasoline go for it. As to the octane rating, gatdammit, the higher rating offers increased knock resistance, but the knock sensor and ECU/EFI programming should be able to deal with just about any swill you put in there. Ducati (and all OEMs) rigorously test the crap out of their machines in every environment and with every fuel available and ensure they're safe in all circumstances. Of course they still come up with their optimum recommendations, but the bike is built to handle the rigors of touring in remote areas where those recommendations can't be met. So don't worry. Try the e-free 89 and if you get a hint of pinging/knocking you'll know whether to stick with it or not. Let us know what you find out. Unfortunately for me here in California there are no such e-free fuels easily available. Oh well.
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Old June 12th, 2013, 05:30 AM   #10
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Yes you are right!

Ethanol free
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