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Old November 22nd, 2017, 09:57 AM   #41
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I Ride: 16 Honda CRF250l, 2016 Hyperstada 939
A remap comes with the full termi system as well as a air box mod of some sort. Yes, stupid expensive (3k installed) but boy what a difference. No more of the snatchy throttle in the low rpms and also a definite kick to the overall power.

I honestly don't have time to mess around with performance mods on the bike and this was just a lazy mans solution. I love it.
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Old November 22nd, 2017, 10:47 AM   #42
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I Ride: 2013 Hypermotard 821
Ok please forgive my ignorance. I am in need of instruction and guidance, dear friends. You cannot insult me so feel free to speak as plainly or obviously as possible, haha!

So my motorcycle, 2013 Hypermotard, has a full termignoni system. *I believe* it has the appropriate termi flash on the ecu because it says "Ducati Race" when I turn it on. That being said, the throttle response is very choppy/nonlinear. I have experienced the same on/off throttle many of you have described in other threads. This is especially prevalent when attempting fine throttle inputs for accel/decal in a turn. So you guys are saying that with the appropriate termi map it shouldn't be having this problem? Or is that only after a tune from some dyno tester?

I bought the bike used from a guy who knew almost nothing about it. It has about 6k miles on the clock. I don't know what all the termi package included, but I can confirm that it has the full pipe not just the slip on. Is there something I need to inspect or see if it is missing? What is you guidance? I know virtually no history on the bike other than the time I've had it. All this being said, I don't have a particular dealer that I go to with services and that sort of stuff (as I bought used). I suppose they would be necessary in determining if it's missing any critical recalls/replacement parts?

Thanks for the help!
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Old November 22nd, 2017, 10:57 AM   #43
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Originally Posted by ripyowrist View Post
Ok please forgive my ignorance. I am in need of instruction and guidance, dear friends. You cannot insult me so feel free to speak as plainly or obviously as possible, haha!

So my motorcycle, 2013 Hypermotard, has a full termignoni system. *I believe* it has the appropriate termi flash on the ecu because it says "Ducati Race" when I turn it on. That being said, the throttle response is very choppy/nonlinear. I have experienced the same on/off throttle many of you have described in other threads. This is especially prevalent when attempting fine throttle inputs for accel/decal in a turn. So you guys are saying that with the appropriate termi map it shouldn't be having this problem? Or is that only after a tune from some dyno tester?

I bought the bike used from a guy who knew almost nothing about it. It has about 6k miles on the clock. I don't know what all the termi package included, but I can confirm that it has the full pipe not just the slip on. Is there something I need to inspect or see if it is missing? What is you guidance? I know virtually no history on the bike other than the time I've had it. All this being said, I don't have a particular dealer that I go to with services and that sort of stuff (as I bought used). I suppose they would be necessary in determining if it's missing any critical recalls/replacement parts?

Thanks for the help!
Out of curiosity, what bike did you come from to this one?
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Old November 22nd, 2017, 11:01 AM   #44
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I Ride: 2013 Hypermotard 821
Kawasaki ZX6R, ZX10R, and a 2013 WR450F

Are you going to say I'm just not used to the throttle response? I've heard that's a real problem for hyper-n00bs. The ninja's are insanely smooth. This is my first ride-by-wire and it seems like I have no control on the throttle.

Or that I have no control over the bike. When I roll on its like nothing nothing, then it falls off a cliff and jerks. It seems like that every time I change throttle position, extremely abrupt.

Last edited by ripyowrist; November 22nd, 2017 at 11:04 AM.
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Old November 22nd, 2017, 11:11 AM   #45
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Kawasaki ZX6R, ZX10R, and a 2013 WR450F

Are you going to say I'm just not used to the throttle response? I've heard that's a real problem for hyper-n00bs. The ninja's are insanely smooth. This is my first ride-by-wire and it seems like I have no control on the throttle.

Or that I have no control over the bike. When I roll on its like nothing nothing, then it falls off a cliff and jerks. It seems like that every time I change throttle position, extremely abrupt.
It is what I was going to suggest. The torque curve is different than the Kawis.

Without watching you, I can't really give any specific advice. You ever ride up anywhere close to the Nashville area?

No remap, or aftermarket fueling will change the throttle response unless it changes the mapping of the throttle unit.
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Old November 22nd, 2017, 11:17 AM   #46
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Hmm, maybe I just need more seat time. Just seems like a lag between input and response, then an abrupt jerk, hard to roll on smoothly.

I actually live in Huntsville. So not too far from Nashville but I've never ridden a bike up that way before.
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Old November 22nd, 2017, 11:33 AM   #47
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Here are a few things to think about. The Hyper engine has some characteristics that will make it behave differently than other bikes. It is a pretty high compression twin with very little rotating mass. There is a light flywheel, small diameter clutch assembly, no counterbalancer mechanism, and belt driven valves. These combine to make a very snappy, responsive engine, but takes away some of the smoothness you can expect from a more docile engine.

Then you have the throttle, completely electronic with a light return spring and pretty aggressive throttle curves (except for wet mode, but who the heck rides in wet mode?). The engine has a single set of injectors, and no secondary throttle bodies or idle circuit, so it leaves the entire low speed throttle up to very fine movements in the throttle plate. Based on my testing, most riding occurs around 2-5% throttle plate opening! That means it's just barely cracked open when you're cruising along. This engine is also tuned for high RPMs, as is very obvious by the enormous exhaust diameter. So you're going to have major tradeoffs at low RPMs and low throttle openings. On the plus side, it's really a screamer up top.

Tuning the engine fuel ratios completely changed the behavior of the engine while accelerating - it's as if there is a nice cushion on every piston stroke, and there is no longer an abrupt transition in the 6000RPM range. However, if you are riding in an area where the throttle is just cracked and you're bouncing between that acceleration-deceleration area, no amount of tuning is going to fix that. It's also funny - when overlaying my test video with the data logs, I could see every bump in the road in my throttle input. Combine that with a sensitive throttle that transitions aggressively from acceleration to deceleration, it's going to be another factor.

My suggestion is when you ride this bike, make very deliberate throttle movements. When you want to accelerate, roll on smoothly and a good amount. When you want to brake, let off completely. Don't hover in in the cracked throttle position and expect it to putt along very smoothly.

Just for reference, my S1000XR has an electronic throttle and runs pretty lean, but is completely smooth in stock form. Four cylinders will be inherently smoother, but BMW also did a much better job at tuning the small throttle openings so it ramps up smoothly and doesn't cut fuel aggressively when you close the throttle. An all around more refined riding experience. Not nearly as fun as the Hyper though!
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Old November 22nd, 2017, 12:05 PM   #48
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kuksul08 what you say makes good sense. Definitely a big difference between two big bore cylinders and four small ones. It seems like riding a bull with a feather for a riding crop. Very light inputs and MASSIVE outputs from the engine in response. I've had concerns in certain situations, like that I'm somehow going to spin the rear wheel mid-turn making a slow-speed maneuver when I'm simply trying to apply a little throttle to accelerate out of the turn. While still leaned, I'm wary of skidding in the turn because a roll of the throttle seems like a big jerk on the bike.

Do I just flog it all the time and accept the sharp changes? Or do you guys just get better at anticipating that the bike is going to buck and ride around it?

Thanks for all the advice and replies. You guys are so awesome
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Old November 22nd, 2017, 12:08 PM   #49
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Hmm, maybe I just need more seat time. Just seems like a lag between input and response, then an abrupt jerk, hard to roll on smoothly.

I actually live in Huntsville. So not too far from Nashville but I've never ridden a bike up that way before.
I'm not too familiar with roads south of Nashville, but if there's any interesting roads between Huntsville and there, I could do some riding with you and see if there's anything I can help out with.
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Old November 22nd, 2017, 01:10 PM   #50
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kuksul08 what you say makes good sense. Definitely a big difference between two big bore cylinders and four small ones. It seems like riding a bull with a feather for a riding crop. Very light inputs and MASSIVE outputs from the engine in response. I've had concerns in certain situations, like that I'm somehow going to spin the rear wheel mid-turn making a slow-speed maneuver when I'm simply trying to apply a little throttle to accelerate out of the turn. While still leaned, I'm wary of skidding in the turn because a roll of the throttle seems like a big jerk on the bike.

Do I just flog it all the time and accept the sharp changes? Or do you guys just get better at anticipating that the bike is going to buck and ride around it?

Thanks for all the advice and replies. You guys are so awesome
I think some patience - it likes precise inputs for reasons noted above. In a month or two it will be second nature as you get a handle on gear selection, engine response and just begin to trust the machine. It will start to flow. If you are uncomfortable, try using urban mode for a while (or whatever they call it on the SP) - you'll have more TC and earlier ABS.

Oddly, I find sport mode to be smoother than touring, especially once out of town, because of the more direct relationship between throttle and response. You can still dial in more TC if it's a concern.

One thing to note: The bike is sensitive to chain adjustment. On a side stand, the chain should be close to, but not touching the swing arm when you pull it up to the adjustment mark. If it's loose it will have a lot of jerky driveline lash.

If it makes you feel better, I've never had the bike step out on me and I've ridden all weather (well not snow but...) and all roads. I started with less experience than you. I came from a Honda - so I was used to smooth - the duc was a wake up call, but I owned it and that was that. I love the damned thing at this point (27,000 miles) and it might have made me a better rider (The jury's out on that though:-))- certainly my wrist is a precision device.

Last edited by appliance821; November 22nd, 2017 at 01:16 PM.
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