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Old July 17th, 2017, 10:24 PM   #1
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Help removing front wheel

Just wondering if anyone as a good how-to on how to remove and replace the front wheel? Putting new rotors on and don't want to get stuck halfway through.

Can anyone verify the size of the front wheel nut for me? I was thinking of getting this tool (Ducati 28mm front axle nut socket) to do the job right and not strip the nut, is that necessary or will any socket do the job?

Also I heard you need a front axle alignment tool like this (Ducati front axle alignment tool for Hypermotard). Is that necessary as well?

Finally can anyone verify the front axle torque value?

Sorry if this has been covered before I searched but didn't find much luck.
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Old July 18th, 2017, 08:33 AM   #2
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Any socket will do, don't need anything special. Don't need any other tools. It's very easy. The nut torque is 63Nm. The pinch bolts are 10Nm. The calipers are 45Nm.

The sequence when you install the front wheel is (when looking at the wheel from the front of the bike):
-Insert the axle from the left side and tighten the nut. The axle will probably start to spin.
-Snug the left side pinch bolts to keep the axle from spinning.
-Torque the axle nut.
-Torque the right side pinch bolts
-Loosen the left side pinch bolts and bounce on the front end gently to ensure the axle is sitting freely in the fork lower (not being twisted or binding in any way)
-Torque the left side pinch bolts.
-Hold the front brake firmly and torque the calipers.

edit: The rotors bolt torque is 30Nm.
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Old July 18th, 2017, 12:01 PM   #3
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Thanks! Really appreciate it!
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Old July 18th, 2017, 05:32 PM   #4
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The axle tool LINK: Ducati 1199 ABS Panigale Ohlins Front Axle Alignment Tool HDESA USA | eBay Will be helpful in drifting the axle out from the left side and then twisting to remove from the right. Helps in getting it back in via twisting as opposed to tapping. Have a shim or two handy to raise the tire when putting the wheel back on. Kuksul and I disagree - I think it's a useful tool. The axle is fragile.

And yes the link is to a 29mm tool that does work.

You will also need molybdenum grease. This is used lightly on the axle, the brake caliper bolts, and the axles bolts if you fully remove them. This will probably do the trick: LINK: https://www.amazon.com/Yamalube-ACC-...ybdenum+grease

Get some wire or bungees to hang the calipers - don't dangle them by their cables.
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Old July 18th, 2017, 08:28 PM   #5
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Yeah.. I mean I see how the tool works, I just never found the need on any bike. The axle always flies right in by hand as long as you jiggle the wheel a little.

Careful with the moly grease. Use it very sparingly and try to avoid threaded portions as it can really throw torque values off - it's mostly used on stationary metal parts and splines. I put that shit on my countershaft when I installed a new front sprocket and the nut, which I torqued down to the massive 176ft-lbs, managed to overcome the bent lock washer and loosen itself half a turn. That moly is SLIPPERY! I wiped it clean and bent all 3 sides down on the nut, which is now holding.
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Old July 18th, 2017, 09:26 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kuksul08 View Post
Yeah.. I mean I see how the tool works, I just never found the need on any bike. The axle always flies right in by hand as long as you jiggle the wheel a little.

Careful with the moly grease. Use it very sparingly and try to avoid threaded portions as it can really throw torque values off - it's mostly used on stationary metal parts and splines. I put that shit on my countershaft when I installed a new front sprocket and the nut, which I torqued down to the massive 176ft-lbs, managed to overcome the bent lock washer and loosen itself half a turn. That moly is SLIPPERY! I wiped it clean and bent all 3 sides down on the nut, which is now holding.
Just changed my sprockets and chain - used the molly - fingers crossed. The manual calls for it as a thread locker for a lot of bolts, and gives the torque values - I'm thinking - with that in mind. If not, my damned bike is going to disintegrate one fine day.

How did you notice the sprocket nut loosening -I'll keep an eye out for the signs.
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Old July 18th, 2017, 10:05 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by appliance821 View Post
Just changed my sprockets and chain - used the molly - fingers crossed. The manual calls for it as a thread locker for a lot of bolts, and gives the torque values - I'm thinking - with that in mind. If not, my damned bike is going to disintegrate one fine day.

How did you notice the sprocket nut loosening -I'll keep an eye out for the signs.
I thought I heard a noise, and checked it. Turns out the noise was unrelated and I just got lucky checking it.

I actually take that back though. I used 70% moly, not the typical 3% moly grease. Probably explains that.

Either way, bend all 3 corners of the lock washer. They are cheap.
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Old July 19th, 2017, 04:13 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by appliance821 View Post
Just changed my sprockets and chain - used the molly - fingers crossed. The manual calls for it as a thread locker for a lot of bolts, and gives the torque values - I'm thinking - with that in mind. If not, my damned bike is going to disintegrate one fine day.

How did you notice the sprocket nut loosening -I'll keep an eye out for the signs.
Moly is not a thread locker, it is a lubricant.

Not having looked at the bike book lately, if it doesn't normally call for thread lube you usually need to lower the torque value by 10-15%.

It also depends on how much you use. The threads do not have to be coated in the stuff, you're just trying to apply a thin film between the threads.
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Old July 19th, 2017, 05:25 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by dragoontwo View Post
Moly is not a thread locker, it is a lubricant.

Not having looked at the bike book lately, if it doesn't normally call for thread lube you usually need to lower the torque value by 10-15%.

It also depends on how much you use. The threads do not have to be coated in the stuff, you're just trying to apply a thin film between the threads.
I understand that it's a lube, but my understanding of its use on blind bolts is that by eliminating the gaps between the threaded bolt and hole it acts as a locker.

One thing I read for using the moly, is that loctite is not to be used on blind bolts. I'm fairly inexperienced, but the manual is pretty explicit. The moly grease it calls for is not anti seize, but more potent as kuksul noted.

I was pondering this, as ducati calls for it on such bolts as the calipers and the chain adjust bolts which are pretty vital.

Never had anything back out or loosen. My concern is the torque values, but I have to think that as it's required, the stated values take it into account.

For the axles and other surfaces (like in the cush drive) it's acting purely as a lube - a dry lube over time.
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Old July 19th, 2017, 07:38 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by appliance821 View Post
I understand that it's a lube, but my understanding of its use on blind bolts is that by eliminating the gaps between the threaded bolt and hole it acts as a locker.
Mostly by the seat of my pants I am going to say no to this. If you manage to get enough(a lot) in there, you will actually blow out the backside with hydraulic pressure.

Besides thread locker and other positive retention devices, the only thing holding fasteners in is the thread stretch of your fastener. The moly is most likely used for lubrication in order to get the proper stretch at a lower torque, to keep the threads from galling, and for dissimilar metal(galvanic) corrosion protection.

The call for no thread locker in blind holes is probably to prevent build up in the end of the hole because most people won't clean it out before reapplying the next round of thread lock.
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