Front suspension question

Jan 2015
340
1
Austria
i doubt that Hyperstradas ever had other forks than Kayaba.
My ex 2013 had a Kayaba fork and my actual 2016 Hyperstrada (normal height) has the same one. As i owned the bikes for some months side by side, I compared forks and switched them, so that i sold my 2013 HS with the brand new 2016 fork and kept the 2013 fork with Andreani cartridges in my new 2016 HS.
Imho, the difference in HS forks only is the heigth normal/low .
 
Apr 2017
16
1
Canada
I agree with you that it seems strange that a fixed suspension would be set from the factory for someone lighter than 120 lbs
Yes, that's what's bothering me. I bought it new off the showroom floor in 2017 and only have 16,000 km on it. Seems weird to have bought a new bike with shot forks. No blown seals or anything obvious, and anyway I don't ride that aggressively anymore.
 
Apr 2017
16
1
Canada
Might also be worth talking to the shop about what they are predisposed to setup suspension for. Setting the bike of for touring as opposed to sport or track riding will be very different. Given what it'll likely cost to have springs or a revalve, probably makes sense to get some drop in cartridges which allow adjustments down the road so you aren't stuck with a specific setting.
Yes, I got that from the long suspension thread. I think investing in cartridges is smarter.
Dumb question: is front sag still supposed to be around 25 - 30 mm, and is that for all types of bikes including off-road? You got me thinking about touring or sport. Do motards have "dual-sport" DNA? If so, does that give them longer fork travel and would that affect the desired sag measurements?
Thanks.
 
Apr 2017
16
1
Canada
once you experience a custom suspension setup for your weight and riding style, it's very unlikely that you would ever consider selling your bike, in my own experience, it makes that much of a difference.
100%.

You also answered my question about the 25-30 mm measurements for the front, so I'm just going to re-measure it myself. I used to do it all the time for previous bikes but I've gotten lazy. Plus they had adjustable suspensions.
 
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Apr 2017
16
1
Canada
Thanks for all the feedback, I've read all the replies a few times and it's greatly, greatly appreciated.
Yes, I had also read about the difference between the two forks in the original suspension thread, another reason I'd rather deal with someone who knows what they're doing.
It's been a long while since I was involved with the racing circuit up here, and I've lost all my contacts but I do remember Traxxion (appliance821). I watched all their videos back in the day, but I'm rusty now, very rusty.
I was lucky enough to speak to an Ohlins guy last week at Americade, and he's given me an Ontario contact that I plan to follow-up with. It's truly worth it to talk to the experts. He knew what the Hyperstrada was, knew what the stock forks were, and was also surprised I was being told I needed stiffer springs. Very validating, I haven't lost my mind yet. I think he also talked me into getting a new shock, ha.
 
Oct 2017
50
1
japan
I love my Mupo suspension. It really transformed the handling. Its like night and day now. Much more stable in the corners. Mupo is middle of the range price wise. At the very least I suggest getting the Andreani fork cartridge kit. On the hyper adjustable dampening in the front is a must. I really like having it in the rear as well. The front was harder to setup as it was difficult for me to use 3/4 of the travel. The spring rate I got in the front might be too stiff. But even so it became much more stable and reassuring while cornering.
 
Jun 2014
979
9
Boston
I've seen the singles for sale and there is an issue in knowing just which fork you have...seems Ducati sourced several and the parts care...I never corresponded with Mupo, Roger Albert at OnRoad/OffRoad did all of that, including the part of figuring out which forks I had, machining the lower so I could have both forks with cartridges, anodizing the fork tubes (still looks good) and DLC'ing the lowers before reassembly...kickin job he did and they work great...I went a little crazy here, don't be insane like me, I suspect a single cartridge will satisfy what ails your front end and you will notice the difference if you do it...
He and Mupo were the people I was talking to. A dead end. In the end, if the internals are being removed, what do they care what's in the fork. IE - I'm 95% sure they're kayaba - but if everything is being pulled - who cares. I sent photos etc.. as requested - and then dead space.

It was a comedy of errors - I'd talk to Mupo - they'd mis-translate to the dealer - I'd send the dealer the exact email thread to clarify - blah blah. I'm sure they do a good job if you can get to that last mile, but despite my patience and attempts to get them all the info they desired, it turned into radio silence.

I think I'll be going with traxxion this winter. Seems straight forward - decent price - good reputation.
 
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Jun 2014
979
9
Boston
I went with mupo because the price from Europe is around $850 delivered for the 2 fork solution. Had it installed for about $350 and I needed a front fork service anyway after 5 years of hard riding. Haven't had a chance to test it thoroughly as I just had my first real ride after getting it back from the shop (winter in New England) - it feels firm but reasonably compliant. I'm playing with compression to smooth out the hard hits some more. The forks, for all the noise, were kayaba. There are some early reviews that indicate otherwise but they are mistaken.
 
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Apr 2017
16
1
Canada
appliance821 thanks for your reply. In fact I measured the front sag myself in October and found it was 45 mm, so indeed too soft. My biggest and stupidest challenge now is to support and balance i so I can remove the forks to bring them to Stadium Suspension here in Quebec. He knows this bike and will do the work. Can't wait. I really, really love this bike and I want it to handle as best as I can afford.
 
Jun 2014
979
9
Boston
appliance821 thanks for your reply. In fact I measured the front sag myself in October and found it was 45 mm, so indeed too soft. My biggest and stupidest challenge now is to support and balance i so I can remove the forks to bring them to Stadium Suspension here in Quebec. He knows this bike and will do the work. Can't wait. I really, really love this bike and I want it to handle as best as I can afford.
If you have a center stand, load up the rear with weights and it will lift the front. Not sure if there's enough space to remove the suspension, but it would be straight forward to assess. I have to say that the forks are much better now - not cushy, but precise and compliant. Next will be a rear shock rebuild - probably at traxxion.
 
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